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Flexibility

Services

All infusions may be customized to fit your needs. Prices will

vary depending upon which additives are in your infusion.

Ask for price details on add ons!

              $150.00

              $185.00

              $185.00

$185.00

               $185.00

              $185.00

                $100.00

                $185.00

ENHANCE YOUR PACKAGE

  • Alpha Lipoic Acid $100

  • ALA $50

  • Amino Acids - Taurine $25

  • Biotin $40

  • Biotin High $60.00

  • B-12 $25

  • B-Complex $25

  • Calcium $30

  • CoQ10 $35

  • Folic Acid $30

  • Glutathione $35

  • Magnesium $25

  • NAD+ $50

  • Taurine $25

  • Toreadol $35

  • Tri-Amino Acids $30

  • Tri-Aminos $50

  • Vitamin C $25

  • Vitamin D3 $30

  • Zinc $40

  • Zofran $35

All infusions may be customized to fit your needs. Prices will vary depending upon which additives are in your infusion. Ask for pricing   details on add ons!

INTRAVENOUS ADMINISTRATION OF NUTRIENTS 

Intravenous administration of nutrients can achieve serum concentrations not obtainable with oral, or even intramuscular (IM), administration. For example, as the oral dose of vitamin C is increased progressively, the serum concentration of ascorbate tends to approach an upper limit, as a result of both saturation of gastrointestinal absorption and a sharp increase in renal clearance of the vitamin. When the daily intake of vitamin C is increased 12-fold, from 200 mg/day to 2,500 mg/day, the plasma concentration increases by only 25 percent, from 1.2 to 1.5 mg/dL. The highest serum vitamin C level reported after oral administration of pharmacological doses of the vitamin is 9.3 mg/dL. In contrast, IV administration of 50 g/day of vitamin C resulted in a mean peak plasma level of 80 mg/dL.4 Similarly, oral supplementation with magnesium results in little or no change in serum magnesium concentrations, whereas IV administration can double or triple the serum levels,5,6 at least for a short period of time. Various nutrients have been shown to exert pharmacological effects, which are in many cases dependent on the concentration of the nutrient. For example, an antiviral effect of vitamin C has been demonstrated at a concentration of 10-15 mg/dL,4 a level achievable with IV but not oral therapy. At a concentration of 88 mg/dL in vitro, vitamin C destroyed 72 percent of the histamine present in the medium.7 Lower concentrations were not tested, but it is possible the serum levels of vitamin C attainable by giving several grams in an IV push would produce an antihistamine effect in vivo. Such an effect would have implications for the treatment of various allergic conditions. Magnesium ions promote relaxation of both vascular 8 and bronchial 9 smooth muscle – effects that might be useful in the acute treatment of vasospastic angina and bronchial asthma, respectively. It is likely these and other nutrients exert additional, as yet unidentified, pharmacological effects when present in high concentrations.

PHARMACOLOGICAL EFFECTS

In addition to having direct pharmacological effects, IV nutrient therapy may be more effective than oral or IM treatment for correcting intracellular nutrient deficits. Some nutrients are present at much higher concentrations in the cells than in the serum. For example, the average magnesium concentration in myocardial cells is 10 times higher than the extracellular concentration. This ratio is maintained in healthy cells by an active-transport system that continually pumps magnesium ions into cells against the concentration gradient. In certain disease states, the capacity of membrane pumps to maintain normal concentration gradients may be compromised. In one study, the mean myocardial magnesium concentration was 65-percent lower in patients with cardiomyopathy than in healthy controls 10 implying a reduction in the intracellular-to-extracellular ratio to less than 4-to-1. As magnesium plays a key role in mitochondrial energy production, intracellular magnesium deficiency may exacerbate heart failure and lead to a vicious cycle of further intracellular magnesium loss and more severe heart failure. Intravenous administration of magnesium, by producing a marked, though transient, increase in the serum concentration, provides a window of opportunity for ailing cells to take up magnesium against a smaller concentration gradient. Nutrients taken up by cells after an IV infusion may eventually leak out again, but perhaps some healing takes place before they do. If cells are repeatedly “flooded” with nutrients, the improvement may be cumulative. It has been the author’s observation that some patients who receive a series of IV injections become progressively healthier. In these patients, the interval between treatments can be gradually increased, and eventually the injections are no longer necessary. Other patients require regular injections for an indefinite period of time in order to control their medical problems. This dependence on IV injections could conceivably result from any of the following: (1) a genetically determined impairment in the capacity to maintain normal intracellular nutrient concentrations;11 (2) an inborn error of metabolism that can be controlled only by maintaining a higher than normal concentration of a particular nutrient; or (3) a renal leak of a nutrient. 12 In some cases, continued IV therapy may be necessary because a disease state is too advanced to be reversible.

Safety is important. And it helps to know about possible side effects. ​

A vitamin drip can cause side effects.

Rarely reported side effects include:

(Please note that these side effects are rare, and tend to resolve following cessation of the intravenous therapy.

 

  • Irritation in the vein, secondary to infusatn's effects on the circulatory system.

  • Lowering of blood pressure

  • Lowering of blood sugar

  • Muscle cramps or weakness

  • Arm pain at the infusion site

  • Lightheadedness

  • Upset stomach

  • Rash

Other important information:

A vitamin drip can temporarily restore hydration and energy. Individual results may vary. And it’s not right for everyone.

Here are some other things you should know: ​

 

Do not take a vitamin drip if you: ​

 

take any medicines called nitrates, often prescribed for chest pain, or guanylate cyclase stimulators like Adempas (riociguat) for pulmonary hypertension. Your blood pressure could drop to an unsafe level.

 

if you have kidney disease. are allergic to any of the ingredients in The most common side effects of a vitamin drip are: 

 

  • Headache

  • Flushing

  • Nausea

  • Dizziness

 

Tell your healthcare provider if you have any side effect that bothers you or does not go away.

These are not all the possible side effects of a vitamin drip.

 

For more information, ask your healthcare provider or pharmacist. Talk to your Doctor: Discuss your general health and dehydration symptoms with your doctor to see if a vitamin drip is right for you

Wondering about possible side effects? 

REFERENCES 

1. Malkiel-Shapiro B. Further observations on parenteral magnesium sulfate therapy in coronary heart disease: a clinical appraisal. S Afr Med J 1958;32:1211-1215.2. Browne SE. Intravenous magnesium sulphate in arterial disease. Practitioner 1969;202:562-564.3. Blanchard J, Tozer TN, Rowland M. Pharmacokinetic perspectives on megadoses of ascorbic acid. Am J Clin Nutr 1997;66:1165-1171.4. Harakeh S, Jariwalla RJ, Pauling L. Suppression of human immunodeficiency virus replication by ascorbate in chronically and acutely infected cells. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 1990;87:7245-7249.5. Okayama H, Aikawa T, Okayama M, et al. Bronchodilating effect of intravenous magnesium sulfate in bronchial asthma. JAMA 1987;257:1076-1078.6. Sydow M, Crozier TA, Zielmann S, et al. High-dose intravenous magnesium sulfate in the management of life-threatening status asthmaticus. Intensive Care Med 1993;19:467-471.7. Uchida K, Mitsui M, Kawakishi S. Monooxygenation of N-acetylhistamine mediated by L-ascorbate. Biochim Biophys Acta 1989;991:377-379.8. Iseri LT, French JH. Magnesium: nature’s physiologic calcium blocker. Am Heart J 1984;108:188-193.9. Brunner EH, Delabroise AM, Haddad ZH. Effect of parenteral magnesium on pulmonary function, plasma cAMP, and histamine in bronchial asthma. J Asthma 1985;22:3-11.10. Frustaci A, Caldarulo M, Schiavoni G, et al. Myocardial magnesium content, histology, and antiarrhythmic response to magnesium infusion. Lancet 1987;2:1019.11. Henrotte JG. The variability of human red blood cell magnesium level according to HLA groups. Tissue Antigens 1980;15:419-430.12. Booth BE, Johanson A. Hypomagnesemia due to renal tubular defect in reabsorption of magnesium. J Pediatr 1974;85:350-354.13. Skobeloff EM, Spivey WH, McNamara RM, Greenspon L. Intravenous magnesium sulfate for the treatment of acute asthma in the emergency department. JAMA 1989;262:1210-1213.14. Bloch H, Silverman R, Mancherje N, et al. Intravenous magnesium sulfate as an adjunct in the treatment of acute asthma. Chest 1995;107:1576-1581.15. Ciarallo L, Brousseau D, Reinert S. Higherdose intravenous magnesium therapy for children with moderate to severe acute asthma. Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med 2000;154:979-983.16. Ciarallo L, Sauer AH, Shannon MW

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